... dedicated to finding caring homes world-wide for orphaned books

HOME
BROWSE
ADVANCED SEARCH
SECURE SITE
SHOPPING TROLLEY
POSTAGE
EMAIL
WHO ARE WE? TESTIMONIALS LINKS CONTACT  DETAILS
 
Return to
ANIMAL KINGDOM ROOM

Search our stock
for books on

ANIMAL STORIES


We invite you
to read our

ARTICLES
on
HEALTH
METAPHYSICS
WRITERS' ANECDOTES
HOW TO WRITE
ANIMAL KINGDOM


We invite you to visit our
SPECIAL INTEREST ROOMS

      DOLPHIN TRANSFORMATION

from
Aquainted with the Night : A Year on the Frontiers of Death
by Ellegra Taylor


The most moving tale of transition and transformation I ever heard was told by Robert White, an American factory worker from North Carolina.

The story had begun when Robert and his wife went to visit their daughter Lee in hospital as they did every evening.

"It's not easy to die when you are fifteen," said Robert, "but Lee had already accepted her fate." As he spoke, his eyes were full of tears and he could barely keep his voice steady.

"She knew she had an illness that would not spare her. She knew that in spite of their finest efforts the doctors couldn't save her. She suffered a lot but never complained. This particular evening she seemed tranquil and composed but suddenly she said, "Mama, daddy - I think I'm going to die soon and I'm afraid. I know I'm going to a better world than this one and I'm longing for some peace at last but it's hard to accept the idea that I'm going to die at only fifteen."

We could have lied, telling her of course she wasn't going to die, but we didn't have the heart. Somehow her courage was worth more than our pretence. We just cuddled her and cried together. Then she said, "I always dreamed of falling in love, getting married, having kids ... but above all I would have liked to work in a big marine park with dolphins. I've loved them and wanted to know more about them since I was little. I still dream of swimming with them free and happy in the open sea."

She'd never asked for anything, but now she said with all the strength she could muster, "Daddy, I want to swim in the open sea among the dolphins just once. Maybe then I wouldn't be so scared of dying."

My wife and I talked it over and decided to do everything we could. We had heard of a research centre in the Florida Keys and we phoned them. "Come at once," they said.

"Three days later we were on our way. When we arrived at Grass Key, Lee was pale and terribly thin. The chemotherapy she'd been having had made all her hair fall out and she looked ghastly, but she didn't want to rest for a minute and begged us to take her straight away to the dolphins. It was an unforgettable scene. When she got into the water, Lee was already so weak she hardly had the strength to move. We had to put her in a wet suit so she wouldn't get cold and a life preserver to keep her afloat.

I towed her out toward the two dolphins, Nat and Tursi, who were frolicking around about thirty feet away from us. At first they seemed distracted and uninterested but when Lee called them softly by name they responded without hesitation.

Nat came over first, raised his head and gave her a kiss on the end of her nose. Then Tursi came over and greeted her with a flurry of little high-pitched squeaks of joy. A second later they picked her up with their mighty fins and carried her out to sea with them.

"It feels like I'm flying!" cried Lee, laughing with delight. I hadn't heard her laugh like that since before she became ill. I could hardly believe it was true, but there she was gripping Nat's fin and challenging the wind and the immensity of the ocean.

The dolphins stayed with Lee for more than an hour, always tender, always attentive, never using any unnecessary force, always responsive to her wishes. From the moment they took her in hand they never left her alone for a second. They got her to play and obeyed her commands with a sweetness that was magical. In their company, Lee found for one last time the enthusiasm and the will to live. She was strong and happy like she used to be. At one point she shouted, "The dolphins have healed me, daddy!"

There are no words to describe the effect that swim had on her. When she got out of the water it was as if she had been reborn.

The next day she was too weak to get out of bed. She didn't even want to talk, but when I took her hand she squeezed it and whispered, "Daddy, don't be sad for me. I'll never be afraid again. The dolphins have made me understand that I have nothing to fear."

The she said, "I know I'm going to die tonight. Promise me that you'll cremate my body and scatter my ashes in the sea where the dolphins swim. They gave me the most beautiful moments of my life. They have left me with a great feeling of peace in my heart and I know they will be with me on the long journey that lies ahead."

Just before dawn she woke and said "Hold me, daddy, I'm so cold." And she died like that in my arms a few minutes later, passing from sleep to death without a ripple.

We cremated her as she wanted and went out the next day to scatter her ashes in the ocean amongst the dolphins. We were all crying, I'm not ashamed to say, not just my wife and I but even the sailors on the boat that had taken us out in the bay.

Suddenly, through our tears, we saw the great arching silver shapes of Nat and Tursi leaping out of the water ahead of us.

They had come to take our daughter home.

 
EMAIL
WHO ARE WE? TESTIMONIALS LINKS CONTACT  DETAILS
HOME
BROWSE
ADVANCED SEARCH
SECURE SITE
SHOPPING TROLLEY
POSTAGE